View Full Version: Joao Havelange

Soccer Futbol Forum > General Soccer Discussion > Joao Havelange


Title: Joao Havelange


raconteur - March 19, 2012 10:02 PM (GMT)
The 95 year old former president of FIFA Joao Havelange is seriously ill.

I think this excerpt from the article sums up both the good and bad sides of Havelange:

Havelange, who will turn 96 in May, presided over FIFA from 1974-98, when he was replaced by current President Sepp Blatter. He remains FIFA’s honorary president.

The Brazilian has been out of the spotlight since leaving the IOC in December, just three days before the IOC’s executive board was preparing to rule on claims that Havelange took a $1 million kickback from World Cup marketing deals while FIFA president.

The case was closed after his resignation, and Havelange avoided punishment that could have been a suspension or even expulsion. Havelange joined the IOC in 1963 and was its oldest member until resigning.

A former Olympic swimmer and water polo player, Havelange served as FIFA president for 24 years and is credited by many for growing football into a global game. Under his watch, FIFA grew from a small organization with a staff of about a dozen to a powerful and vigorous enterprise administering the multibillion-dollar sport worldwide.

He expanded the World Cup from 16 to 32 teams, and helped the competition become one of the most important and lucrative sporting events in the world. He organized six World Cups as FIFA president.

Havelange also presided over the Brazilian Football Confederation for nearly two decades, including the period spanning Brazil’s first three World Cup titles in 1958, 1962 and 1970.

Don Balon - March 19, 2012 10:14 PM (GMT)
Havelange is I think alot like Juan Antonio Samaranch the former head of the International Olympic Committee. They oversaw huge expansion of their organisations and their principal sporting event which not only increased access and visibility to their events around the world but also brought in enormous amounts of revenues to their organisations. Their problems however were they also saw it as a way to enrich themselves even more than they were contractually supposed to earn and they each also turned an eye away from corruption amongst others in their organisations.

rosarino - March 20, 2012 02:39 AM (GMT)
Yes Don Balon has summed up Havelange, Samaranch and I would add Blatter too, men who did some good things for their sporting organizations but who also saw those accomplishments overshadowed by their greed.

Nkono - March 20, 2012 04:03 AM (GMT)
Havelange did a lot of good things in opening football up to countries from Africa and Asia. The cynics from western Europe thought those were mainly for vote gathering to remain in power but the effect was increased opportunities for football from those continents. So to me Havelange accomplished many good things while in office. But those do get blotted by his personal corruption and his turning a blind eye to the corruption of others.

Merengue - July 11, 2012 09:09 PM (GMT)
QUOTE
Former FIFA president Joao Havelange and one-time Brazilian football leader Ricardo Teixeira received millions of dollars in a World Cup kickbacks scandal, football's world governing body confirmed on Wednesday.

FIFA finally published a Swiss court dossier which detailed that Teixeira received at least 12.74 million Swiss francs (now $13 million) from 1992-97 in payments from World Cup marketing partner ISL. The Swiss-based agency's collapse into bankruptcy in 2001 sparked a criminal probe and exposed the routine practice of buying influence from top sports officials.

The 41-page document showed Havelange received a payment of 1.5 million Swiss francs (then about $1 million) in 1997, one year before he was succeeded as FIFA president by Sepp Blatter.

Payments "attributed" to accounts connected to the two Brazilians totaled almost 22 million Swiss francs from 1992-2000.


Of course neither will be prosecuted as they and FIFA reached a settlement agreement with Swiss prosecutors, basically the repayment of some but not all of the kickbacks they took and by resigning from various IOC and FIFA boards, neither can now be disciplined by those organizations either.

Definitely one of the seamier tales about this sport.

The Artful Codger - July 12, 2012 12:50 AM (GMT)
And apparently Blatter knew all about this as a payment to Havelange was mistakenly sent to a FIFA controlled account.

But Blatter and his minnions arranged for a settlement where this would all be brushed under the carpet. They then tried to block disclosure of this information.

Remind me again why Blatter is still the head of FIFA?

carioca - July 12, 2012 06:24 PM (GMT)
I guess we now know the real reasons Teixeira stepped down from both his FIFA and CBF (Brasilian federation) posts, he knew this report was coming out. But with their partial repayment and the eventual settlement, they cannot be prosecuted and by stepping down from his posts, he also cannot be further investigated by FIFA.

Havelange and his ex son in law Teixeira are laughing all the way to the bank. Sad because, as others stated, havelange did do a lot of good for the sport around the world but his name will always be dirtied by this corruption.

Rufus T. Firefly - July 12, 2012 11:57 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (The Artful Codger @ Jul 11 2012, 04:50 PM)
And apparently Blatter knew all about this as a payment to Havelange was mistakenly sent to a FIFA controlled account.

But Blatter and his minnions arranged for a settlement where this would all be brushed under the carpet. They then tried to block disclosure of this information.

Remind me again why Blatter is still the head of FIFA?

Having Blatter remain the president of FIFA and be in charge of reforming the institution, when he knew about these payments to Havelange and Teixeira, is a lot like having the fox guarding the hen house!

raconteur - July 15, 2012 03:27 AM (GMT)
Blatter is trying to save face by now saying he did not know about these payments to the Boys from Brazil until after ISL's collapse. But look at this: Bundesliga president calls for Blatter to resign. That is a powerful voice against him. Probably (hopefully?) the first of many calling for his ouster.

Sammy Maudlin - July 16, 2012 06:11 PM (GMT)
Blatter is getting increasingly desperate and now says he is in favor of FIFA stripping Joao Havelange's honorary president status. And in an attack in reprisal for the Bundesliga's chief criticizing him, Blatter is now hinting that Germany "bought" the 2006 World Cup by paying off an Executive Committee member!

The pleas of a desperate man.

Merengue - July 19, 2012 05:47 PM (GMT)
I think this thread has morphed into a general FIFA & corruption thread so I'll post this article on how CAS has overturned Mohamed Bin Hammam's lifetime ban from FIFA.

The arbitration court determined that,

“insufficient evidence” for soccer’s governing body to expel the Qatari. FIFA acted after asking former Federal Bureau of Investigation head Louis Freeh to investigate claims Bin Hammam paid $40,000 to Caribbean voters in return for their backing.

CAS stated that the FIFA report prepared by Freeh was not complete enough and did not fill in the "gaps in the record" such as the source of the money which was paid to each of the Caribbean countries representatives by Jack Warner. At first Warner said the money was a gift from the Caribbean Football Union then changed his story to say it was from Bin Hammam, CAS said FIFA's report never directly proved the money came from Bin Hammam. Apparently they did not find Warner's story convincing enough.

Sammy Maudlin - July 19, 2012 09:19 PM (GMT)
So Bin Hammam gets off because Louis Freeh's investigation on behalf of FIFA was not thorough enough. Sad but at least Bin Hammam will still be out of the game because of an Asian Confedration investigation into additional bribery attempts.

Alexao - July 21, 2012 08:59 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (Sammy Maudlin @ Jul 19 2012, 01:19 PM)
So Bin Hammam gets off because Louis Freeh's investigation on behalf of FIFA was not thorough enough. Sad but at least Bin Hammam will still be out of the game because of an Asian Confedration investigation into additional bribery attempts.

This article helps explain what other nefarious deeds Bin Hammam has been up to.

The man in charge of Asian soccer, once a candidate to oust FIFA president Sepp Blatter as the sport's leader, enriched himself and handed out hundreds of thousands of dollars to friends and relatives, according to an audit obtained by The Associated Press.

Mohamed bin Hammam, a 63-year-old Qatari whose life ban from soccer was overturned in a sports court this week, is accused of using the Asian Football Confederation bank accounts to conduct his private affairs.

The audit was prepared by the international accounting firm of PricewaterhouseCoopers and dated July 13. A copy of the report was obtained by the AP. Its contents were confirmed by two people with direct knowledge of the report who spoke on condition of anonymity because it hasn't been made public




* Hosted for free by InvisionFree