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 Oxymoron, DYK Fact #58
gwendolinest
Posted: 18:37 Friday 19 January 2007


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Did you know? An oxymoron is “a figure of speech that combines two usually contradictory terms in a compressed paradox, as in the word bittersweet or the phrase living death” (The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, Chris Baldick, first edition, 1990).

An example of an oxymoron I recently came across while pillaging on the Hunter Ocean is the juxtaposition of Booched and Incredible as captured in the following screenie: ROFL.gif



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Ebudae
Posted: 19:08 Friday 19 January 2007


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Would something that’s a little big look pretty ugly? wink.gif



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Ebudć
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gwendolinest
Posted: 20:32 Friday 19 January 2007


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I don’t know. I’m utterly speechless. Haha.gif


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BarnabyRudge
Posted: 00:10 Saturday 20 January 2007


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Oxymorons are used all the time, most of the time without our realizing it at all – indeed, it can be quite a challenge is to spot one exactly when it's being used! However, I once spotted an oxymoron myself while reading a news article. It was this BBC article:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/4400208.stm
QUOTE
But their opponents say it is a sensationalist phrase which can foment sectarian strife in a country with a sizeable Christian minority.

The last three words form an oxymoronic phrase. cool.gif
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George Law
Posted: 00:38 Saturday 20 January 2007


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QUOTE (gwendolinest @ 18:37 GMT Friday 19 January 2007)
Did you know? An oxymoron is “a figure of speech that combines two usually contradictory terms in a compressed paradox, as in the word bittersweet or the phrase living death” (The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, Chris Baldick, first edition, 1990).

I don’t really agree that oxymorons are paradoxes. Oxymorons make sense – their meaning is straightforward; it is only when we try and analyse them that they appear to be “funny”. For example, there is nothing wrong with saying that a car is “slowing down quickly” or “speeding up slowly” – it means that if v is the car’s velocity and t is time, dv/dt is negative with a large absolute value or positive with a small absolute value respectively. A paradox, on the other hand, is something that has no logical solution (e.g. liar paradox, barber paradox).



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BarnabyRudge
Posted: 21:45 Friday 26 January 2007


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Did you know? The title of some films provide examples of oxymoron: Eyes Wide Shut, True Lies, etc.
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gwendolinest
Posted: 14:50 Sunday 04 February 2007


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Did you know? In Chapter 49 (Volume III Chapter XIII) of Jane Austen’s Emma, Mr (George) Knightley – who was in love with Emma – thought of Emma as “faultless in spite of all her faults”. Yearning.gif

Is that an oxymoron? If it is, it’s a brilliant one! ThumbsUp.gif


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Athene_noctua
Posted: 18:53 Tuesday 06 February 2007


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Another “brilliant” oxymoron:

still beating heart

Written by someone on the Hunter Ocean Unofficial Forums.



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BarnabyRudge
Posted: 20:12 Friday 09 February 2007


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Did you know? Clay that's been left out in the sun is hardly soft. wink.gif
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George Law
Posted: 20:52 Friday 09 February 2007


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Did you know? A half-naked person is barely dressed.



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BarnabyRudge
Posted: 21:33 Friday 09 February 2007


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Did you know? A small amount is scarcely a lot. Waggish.gif
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Ebudae
Posted: 21:59 Friday 09 February 2007


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Did you know? A desperate philanthropist badly wants to do good. Mischief.gif



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Ebudć
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Bruckner fan
Posted: 00:56 Friday 30 March 2007


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What about ... "really imaginative"? Does that count as an oxymoron?
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Athene_noctua
Posted: 01:30 Friday 30 March 2007


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I think so. smile.gif

Did you know? There exists an entity that is both real and imaginary. It’s the number 0 – regarded as the complex number 0+0i. ohmy.gif



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JaneFairfax
Posted: 10:14 Friday 30 March 2007


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Did you know? In general topology, there exist sets that are both open and closed! ohmy.gif
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algebraic topology
Posted: 11:40 Friday 30 March 2007


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Did you know?

They are called clopen sets.

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Athene_noctua
Posted: 18:38 Sunday 14 December 2008


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Did you know? The title of one of Elliott Carter’s compositions is oxymoronic: Triple Duo. wacko.gif



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shyvera
Posted: 09:27 Saturday 03 July 2010


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On Thursday, I had a whole half-chicken for supper. That's an oxymoron, isn't it? It was half a spring chicken, and I ate the whole of it! Waggish.gif
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Nehushtan
Posted: 01:57 Monday 01 April 2013


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Did you know? The thermodynamic concept of entropy can be described oxymoronically as “order of disorder”.

http://www.sciforums.com/showthread.php?134169-entropy-and-expansion-of-universe&p=3056477#post3056477



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Holding on to anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die.
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shyvicky
Posted: 17:59 Wednesday 11 September 2013


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Did you know? The sentence “I am going to come” is an oxymoron.
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Nehushtan
Posted: 01:08 Monday 31 March 2014


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Did you know? If I said that someone was an unpleasant kind of person, I would be uttering an oxymoron.



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Holding on to anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die.
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Olinguito
Posted: 18:23 Friday 25 April 2014


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I have just read about oxymoron in the Collins English Dictionary. Did you know? The plural of “oxymoron” is “oxymora”.


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Bassaricyon neblina
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shyvicky
Posted: 16:58 Tuesday 29 April 2014


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Spot the oxymoron in this sentence: “Something was left right in the middle of the room.”
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Olinguito
Posted: 10:51 Monday 28 July 2014


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The back-page headline of today’s Metro reads: “Cook gets pain relief as England show fight”. (The story is about the first day of the Third Test against India at Southampton, in which the under-pressure England captain Alastair Cook made 95 in England’s 247 for 2.)

Did you know? The phrase “pain relief” is an oxymoron.


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Bassaricyon neblina
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shysophie
Posted: 15:04 Tuesday 23 September 2014


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I wonder how much scientists have learnt so far about events in the first second after the Big Bang.

“First second”. wink.gif
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