zIFBoards - Free Forum Hosting
Create your own social network with a free forum.

Learn More · Sign-up for Free
Welcome to Did You Know?

Name:   Password:


 

 Oxymoron, DYK Fact #58
gwendolinest
Posted: 18:37 Friday 19 January 2007


Renaissance


Group: Friends
Posts: 183
Member No.: 4
Joined: 03 Jan 2007



Did you know? An oxymoron is “a figure of speech that combines two usually contradictory terms in a compressed paradox, as in the word bittersweet or the phrase living death” (The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, Chris Baldick, first edition, 1990).

An example of an oxymoron I recently came across while pillaging on the Hunter Ocean is the juxtaposition of Booched and Incredible as captured in the following screenie: ROFL.gif



--------------------
user posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted image
Top
Ebudae
Posted: 19:08 Friday 19 January 2007


The Enlightenment


Group: Admin
Posts: 934
Member No.: 1
Joined: 02 Jan 2007



Would something that’s a little big look pretty ugly? wink.gif



--------------------
Ebudæ
Top
gwendolinest
Posted: 20:32 Friday 19 January 2007


Renaissance


Group: Friends
Posts: 183
Member No.: 4
Joined: 03 Jan 2007



I don’t know. I’m utterly speechless. Haha.gif


--------------------
user posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted image
Top
BarnabyRudge
Posted: 00:10 Saturday 20 January 2007


Age of Reason


Group: Moderators
Posts: 365
Member No.: 6
Joined: 04 Jan 2007



Oxymorons are used all the time, most of the time without our realizing it at all – indeed, it can be quite a challenge is to spot one exactly when it's being used! However, I once spotted an oxymoron myself while reading a news article. It was this BBC article:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/4400208.stm
QUOTE
But their opponents say it is a sensationalist phrase which can foment sectarian strife in a country with a sizeable Christian minority.

The last three words form an oxymoronic phrase. cool.gif
Top
George Law
Posted: 00:38 Saturday 20 January 2007


Nirvana


Group: Moderators
Posts: 1 270
Member No.: 3
Joined: 03 Jan 2007



QUOTE (gwendolinest @ 18:37 GMT Friday 19 January 2007)
Did you know? An oxymoron is “a figure of speech that combines two usually contradictory terms in a compressed paradox, as in the word bittersweet or the phrase living death” (The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, Chris Baldick, first edition, 1990).

I don’t really agree that oxymorons are paradoxes. Oxymorons make sense – their meaning is straightforward; it is only when we try and analyse them that they appear to be “funny”. For example, there is nothing wrong with saying that a car is “slowing down quickly” or “speeding up slowly” – it means that if v is the car’s velocity and t is time, dv/dt is negative with a large absolute value or positive with a small absolute value respectively. A paradox, on the other hand, is something that has no logical solution (e.g. liar paradox, barber paradox).



--------------------
 
Top
BarnabyRudge
Posted: 21:45 Friday 26 January 2007


Age of Reason


Group: Moderators
Posts: 365
Member No.: 6
Joined: 04 Jan 2007



Did you know? The title of some films provide examples of oxymoron: Eyes Wide Shut, True Lies, etc.
Top
gwendolinest
Posted: 14:50 Sunday 04 February 2007


Renaissance


Group: Friends
Posts: 183
Member No.: 4
Joined: 03 Jan 2007



Did you know? In Chapter 49 (Volume III Chapter XIII) of Jane Austen’s Emma, Mr (George) Knightley – who was in love with Emma – thought of Emma as “faultless in spite of all her faults”. Yearning.gif

Is that an oxymoron? If it is, it’s a brilliant one! ThumbsUp.gif


--------------------
user posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted imageuser posted image
Top
Athene_noctua
Posted: 18:53 Tuesday 06 February 2007


Beyond Infinity


Group: Admin
Posts: 2 202
Member No.: 2
Joined: 03 Jan 2007



Another “brilliant” oxymoron:

still beating heart

Written by someone on the Hunter Ocean Unofficial Forums.



--------------------
Top
BarnabyRudge
Posted: 20:12 Friday 09 February 2007


Age of Reason


Group: Moderators
Posts: 365
Member No.: 6
Joined: 04 Jan 2007



Did you know? Clay that's been left out in the sun is hardly soft. wink.gif
Top
George Law
Posted: 20:52 Friday 09 February 2007


Nirvana


Group: Moderators
Posts: 1 270
Member No.: 3
Joined: 03 Jan 2007



Did you know? A half-naked person is barely dressed.



--------------------
 
Top
BarnabyRudge
Posted: 21:33 Friday 09 February 2007


Age of Reason


Group: Moderators
Posts: 365
Member No.: 6
Joined: 04 Jan 2007



Did you know? A small amount is scarcely a lot. Waggish.gif
Top
Ebudae
Posted: 21:59 Friday 09 February 2007


The Enlightenment


Group: Admin
Posts: 934
Member No.: 1
Joined: 02 Jan 2007



Did you know? A desperate philanthropist badly wants to do good. Mischief.gif



--------------------
Ebudæ
Top
Bruckner fan
Posted: 00:56 Friday 30 March 2007


Renaissance


Group: Friends
Posts: 249
Member No.: 21
Joined: 10 Mar 2007



What about ... "really imaginative"? Does that count as an oxymoron?
Top
Athene_noctua
Posted: 01:30 Friday 30 March 2007


Beyond Infinity


Group: Admin
Posts: 2 202
Member No.: 2
Joined: 03 Jan 2007



I think so. smile.gif

Did you know? There exists an entity that is both real and imaginary. It’s the number 0 – regarded as the complex number 0+0i. ohmy.gif



--------------------
Top
JaneFairfax
Posted: 10:14 Friday 30 March 2007


The Enlightenment


Group: Moderators
Posts: 673
Member No.: 20
Joined: 03 Mar 2007



Did you know? In general topology, there exist sets that are both open and closed! ohmy.gif
Top
algebraic topology
Posted: 11:40 Friday 30 March 2007


Renaissance


Group: Friends
Posts: 143
Member No.: 14
Joined: 20 Feb 2007



Did you know?

They are called clopen sets.

Top
Athene_noctua
Posted: 18:38 Sunday 14 December 2008


Beyond Infinity


Group: Admin
Posts: 2 202
Member No.: 2
Joined: 03 Jan 2007



Did you know? The title of one of Elliott Carter’s compositions is oxymoronic: Triple Duo. wacko.gif



--------------------
Top
shyvera
Posted: 09:27 Saturday 03 July 2010


The Enlightenment


Group: Moderators
Posts: 512
Member No.: 150
Joined: 29 Mar 2009



On Thursday, I had a whole half-chicken for supper. That's an oxymoron, isn't it? It was half a spring chicken, and I ate the whole of it! Waggish.gif
Top
Nehushtan
Posted: 01:57 Monday 01 April 2013


Medieval Times


Group: Admin
Posts: 124
Member No.: 74
Joined: 31 Oct 2008



Did you know? The thermodynamic concept of entropy can be described oxymoronically as “order of disorder”.

http://www.sciforums.com/showthread.php?134169-entropy-and-expansion-of-universe&p=3056477#post3056477



--------------------
Holding on to anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die.
Top
shyvicky
Posted: 17:59 Wednesday 11 September 2013


Iron Age


Group: Moderators
Posts: 34
Member No.: 71
Joined: 28 Oct 2008



Did you know? The sentence “I am going to come” is an oxymoron.
Top
Nehushtan
Posted: 01:08 Monday 31 March 2014


Medieval Times


Group: Admin
Posts: 124
Member No.: 74
Joined: 31 Oct 2008



Did you know? If I said that someone was an unpleasant kind of person, I would be uttering an oxymoron.



--------------------
Holding on to anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die.
Top
Olinguito
Posted: 18:23 Friday 25 April 2014


Age of Reason


Group: Admin
Posts: 339
Member No.: 219
Joined: 21 Apr 2014



I have just read about oxymoron in the Collins English Dictionary. Did you know? The plural of “oxymoron” is “oxymora”.


--------------------
Bassaricyon neblina
Top
shyvicky
Posted: 16:58 Tuesday 29 April 2014


Iron Age


Group: Moderators
Posts: 34
Member No.: 71
Joined: 28 Oct 2008



Spot the oxymoron in this sentence: “Something was left right in the middle of the room.”
Top
Olinguito
Posted: 10:51 Monday 28 July 2014


Age of Reason


Group: Admin
Posts: 339
Member No.: 219
Joined: 21 Apr 2014



The back-page headline of today’s Metro reads: “Cook gets pain relief as England show fight”. (The story is about the first day of the Third Test against India at Southampton, in which the under-pressure England captain Alastair Cook made 95 in England’s 247 for 2.)

Did you know? The phrase “pain relief” is an oxymoron.


--------------------
Bassaricyon neblina
Top
shysophie
Posted: 15:04 Tuesday 23 September 2014


Bronze Age


Group: Moderators
Posts: 20
Member No.: 85
Joined: 03 Nov 2008



I wonder how much scientists have learnt so far about events in the first second after the Big Bang.

“First second”. wink.gif
Top
Olinguito
Posted: 11:58 Friday 24 October 2014


Age of Reason


Group: Admin
Posts: 339
Member No.: 219
Joined: 21 Apr 2014



Earlier today I enjoyed listening on BBC Radio 3 to Béla Bartók’s Concerto for Orchestra, played by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra with Pierre Boulez as conductor.

Did you know? The phrase “concerto for orchestra” can be seen as something of an oxymoron.


--------------------
Bassaricyon neblina
Top
0 User(s) are reading this topic (0 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:
« Next Oldest | Literature & Literary Criticism | Next Newest »
zIFBoards - Free Forum Hosting
Enjoy forums? Start your own community for free.
Learn More · Sign-up for Free

Topic Options



Hosted for free by zIFBoards* (Terms of Use: Updated 2/10/2010) | Powered by Invision Power Board v1.3 Final © 2003 IPS, Inc.
Page creation time: 0.2528 seconds | Archive