Welcome to Did You Know?

Name:   Password:


 

 Large Hadron Collider, DYK Fact #456
goldenhinde
  Posted: 18:36 Friday 08 August 2008


Renaissance


Group: Friends
Posts: 172
Member No.: 37
Joined: 03 Apr 2008



Did you know? The Large Hadron Collider, the world’s most powerful and largest particle accelerator, is being turned on 10 September.

Athene_Nocuta this is more in your neck of
the woods located on the border between France and Switzerland, Cern.

There is the smallest possibility that our whole universe is a vacum bubble,
and a super large particle experiment could tear the fabric and cause a vacum
decay from which there is no retreat.
At the end of this article, see the section on particle accelerators
Cheers smile.gif

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vacuum_bubble
Top
Athene_noctua
Posted: 10:36 Saturday 09 August 2008


Beyond Infinity


Group: Admin
Posts: 2 202
Member No.: 2
Joined: 03 Jan 2007



And they are going to look for the Higgs boson with that thing? wink.gif



--------------------
Top
goldenhinde
Posted: 15:11 Sunday 10 August 2008


Renaissance


Group: Friends
Posts: 172
Member No.: 37
Joined: 03 Apr 2008



Oh, yes !
Top
Athene_noctua
Posted: 22:08 Thursday 14 August 2008


Beyond Infinity


Group: Admin
Posts: 2 202
Member No.: 2
Joined: 03 Jan 2007



Did you know? In a particle accelerator, particles are accelerated by electric fields and deflected by magnetic fields. I have just read about nuclear accelerators in the spread “Atoms and Subatomic Particles” under the section The Nature of the Universe of The Guinness Encylopedia. wink.gif



--------------------
Top
goldenhinde
  Posted: 01:20 Friday 15 August 2008


Renaissance


Group: Friends
Posts: 172
Member No.: 37
Joined: 03 Apr 2008



Athene_Noctua: Do you know when and where the first particle
accelerator in the world was built?
Answer: It was the Cyclotron in Berkeley built by Ernest Orlando Lawrence
in the 1930s.

Athene: The Large Hadron Collidor is being turned on Wednesday at Cern.
While there is almost no chance a black hole will be created to swall up everything. No chance is better than almost no chance smile.gif

Also, a very toxic element in the Martian soil was found today which may preclude
life
if you get this post today go to
www.cnn.com
scroll down and look for the links
you may have some better British links
you always provide here

P.S. I'm listening to Bach's Violin Concerto in my car
these last few days, I can't stop smile.gif
Top
goldenhinde
  Posted: 20:12 Monday 08 September 2008


Renaissance


Group: Friends
Posts: 172
Member No.: 37
Joined: 03 Apr 2008



Athene_Noctua:
quick look at my Large Hadron Collider update #456
Top
Athene_noctua
Posted: 00:13 Tuesday 09 September 2008


Beyond Infinity


Group: Admin
Posts: 2 202
Member No.: 2
Joined: 03 Jan 2007



We’ll see what happens when the accelerator is turned on on Monday. smile.gif



--------------------
Top
goldenhinde
  Posted: 17:26 Tuesday 09 September 2008


Renaissance


Group: Friends
Posts: 172
Member No.: 37
Joined: 03 Apr 2008



No, Athene_Nocuta. Tomorrow. about 03:30 Eastern time (USA)

you can follow the hoopla here
http://lhc-first-beam.web.cern.ch

Well it's been nice knowing you !





P.S. sorry I can't get that webb address above to
work for you but it was given in the New York Times.
you could watch the turning on of the Large Hadron Collider
tomorrow as it will be webb cam

)
Top
Athene_noctua
Posted: 13:12 Wednesday 10 September 2008


Beyond Infinity


Group: Admin
Posts: 2 202
Member No.: 2
Joined: 03 Jan 2007




Working LHC produces first images

Protons have made their first complete lap of the world’s most powerful accelerator to cheers and high fives from assembled physicists.

At 10:25 (local time) scientists sent a single beam of protons in a clockwise direction around the full 27 kilometres of the Large Hadron Collider at the CERN laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland.

The journey began at 09:30 when LHC project leader Lyn Evans and his team launched protons into the ring. Progress was made in short steps of a few kilometres, so that physicists could learn how to steer the beam, which is travelling at 99.9998% the speed of light.

However, it will be several weeks before physicists accelerate two proton beams travelling in opposite directions to their full energy of 7 teraelectronvolts, and smash them head on.
More at New Scientist


--------------------
Top
goldenhinde
  Posted: 18:43 Wednesday 10 September 2008


Renaissance


Group: Friends
Posts: 172
Member No.: 37
Joined: 03 Apr 2008



thanks for your update.

here's a trivia question

Do you know which piece of classical music was used

in Stanley Kubrick's 2001 ?
Top
George Law
Posted: 15:40 Sunday 19 June 2011


Nirvana


Group: Moderators
Posts: 1 270
Member No.: 3
Joined: 03 Jan 2007



I read about accelerators in the third chapter of my textbook of particle physics this morning. Did you know? Particle accelerators can be linear or cyclic. They can be fixed-target machines or colliders as well. A cyclic collider which allows particle beams to be kept circulating for a long time – such as the LHC – is also called a storage ring.




--------------------
 
Top
Sophie
Posted: 18:49 Thursday 16 February 2012


Renaissance


Group: Friends
Posts: 139
Member No.: 171
Joined: 04 Sep 2010



Tuesday 14 February 2012

LHC energy boost will aid hunt for Higgs boson

Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will increase the energies of the bunches of subatomic particles called protons that it smashes together.

The boost should improve the collider’s chances of discovering “new physics” and definitively confirming or denying the existence of Higgs boson particle.

The proton beams’ energies will be increased by 14%, for a total collision energy of 8 trillion electron volts.
Full story at BBC News


--------------------
Σοφία
Top
Sylvia
Posted: 19:08 Thursday 16 February 2012


Renaissance


Group: Friends
Posts: 133
Member No.: 170
Joined: 30 Aug 2010



Monday 13 February 2012

LHC boosts energy to snag Higgs – and superpartners

It has already broken the record for the most energetic particle collisions, but the world’s largest particle smasher is boosting its energy still further. Physicists at the Large Hadron Collider hope this will confirm or rule out tantalising hints of the elusive Higgs particle.

The LHC has already seen many events that could be signs of the decay of the long-sought Higgs boson, which is thought to endow other particles with mass. But more mundane reactions can also produce such events, so more experiments are needed to confirm or rule out the Higgs explanation.

Now the LHC’s management has decided to boost the energy of collisions to get a better chance of flushing the Higgs out into the open.
Full story at NewScientist


--------------------
Sylvia A. Anderson
Top
Sylvia
Posted: 15:57 Sunday 01 April 2012


Renaissance


Group: Friends
Posts: 133
Member No.: 170
Joined: 30 Aug 2010



Did you know? The predecessor of the LHC was the LEP, the Large Electron–Positron Collider. I have just read about it in the sixth chapter of the book Antimatter by Frank Close. smile.gif


--------------------
Sylvia A. Anderson
Top
Nehushtan
Posted: 19:52 Monday 18 March 2013


Medieval Times


Group: Admin
Posts: 124
Member No.: 74
Joined: 31 Oct 2008



Tuesday 12 March 2013

Mystery boson earns Higgs status thanks to W particle

Say hello to Higgs. New data confirms that the unsatisfyingly named “Higgs-like particle” announced at CERN last year really is a Higgs boson.

There’s still an important distinction, though. “It is legitimate to call this beastie ‘a’ Higgs boson,” says Raymond Volkas, of the University of Melbourne in Australia, but not “the Higgs”.


--------------------
Holding on to anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die.
Top
shysophie
Posted: 11:16 Tuesday 08 October 2013


New Stone Age


Group: Moderators
Posts: 15
Member No.: 85
Joined: 03 Nov 2008



Did you know? The Higgs particle is named after Peter W. Higgs, who is a joint recipient, with François Englert, of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics. The announcement of the prize was made by the Nobel Committee in Stockholm half an hour ago.
Top
Olinguito
Posted: 15:13 Monday 16 June 2014


Age of Reason


Group: Admin
Posts: 265
Member No.: 219
Joined: 21 Apr 2014



Friday 13 June 2014

Higgs boson scientists are knighted

A scientist who predicted the Higgs boson – and another who helped to find it – have been knighted in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list.

Prof Tom Kibble of Imperial College London was one of six researchers whose work in the 1960s led to the eventual discovery of the Higgs.

The elusive particle was finally detected in 2012 at Cern by two giant experiments – Atlas and CMS.

CMS was designed by Prof Tejinder Jim Virdee, also of Imperial.

Prof Virdee developed new technologies within the detector that ultimately allowed it to find the Higgs – the mechanism which explains how sub-atomic particles came to have substance, or mass.
BBC News


--------------------
Bassaricyon neblina
Top
0 User(s) are reading this topic (0 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:
« Next Oldest | Natural Sciences & Mathematics | Next Newest »


Topic Options



Hosted for free by InvisionFree* (Terms of Use: Updated 2/10/2010) | Powered by Invision Power Board v1.3 Final © 2003 IPS, Inc.
Page creation time: 0.4161 seconds | Archive