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Title: Some of the Great Ones, Gone, Not Forgot


Summerrain - February 1, 2009 08:52 PM (GMT)
Thought I would start this thread and add to it periodically with people and animals of past Rodeo History. I think, if your going to be in this biz, its great to know about the history of rodeo to some degree, especially when it comes to the animals, whether its bulls or horses. Alot new coming into the biz havent even heard of some of these animals. I believe all of them played apart in the industry then and they continue even now although they are gone. SR
NOTE: Inducted is referring to the PRCA Hall of Fame

TORNADO
livestock • Bull • Inducted 1979

During a 14-year period, Tornado, a Hereford-Brahma cross-breed, bucked off every cowboy – all 220 of them – who tried to ride him. Owned by legend Jim Shoulders, the 1,800-pound bull met his match, however, at the 1967 National Finals Rodeo where he was paired with ProRodeo Hall of Famer Freckles Brown. Brown, the 1962 world champion, was 46 years old at the time and still riding better than cowboys half his age. At the end of eight seconds, Brown had broken Tornado’s streak. Applause for both man and bull reportedly shook the rafters. Shoulders said, “If anyone ever rode this bull, I’d rather it was Freckles.” Tornado was retired in 1968, and Freckles retired from competition in 1974.

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RED ROCK
livestock • Bull • Inducted 1990

Red Rock, owned by Growney Brothers Rodeo Company, started bucking in PRCA rodeos in 1983. He retired from the arena after the 1987 National Finals Rodeo, unridden in 309 attempts. His retirement was brief. In 1988, John Growney created the “Challenge of the Champions.” This seven-ride match pitted Red Rock, 1987 PRCA Bucking Bull of the Year, against Lane Frost, 1987 world bull riding champion. Frost finished with a 4-3 advantage, but it did more to Red Rock’s fame than his previous 309-0 record. Red Rock retired at the Growney Brothers Ranch in Red Bluff, Calif., and died in 1994.

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OSCAR
livestock • Bull • Inducted 1979

In Oscar’s first five years as a bucking bull, more than 100 cowboys tried to ride him and every one of them failed to make the eight-second horn. A bronze “Oscar” was offered by owner RSC (Rodeo Stock Contractors) to the first man to ride him. The trophy wasn’t collected until 1975 when John Davis made it to the whistle. Oscar, unlike many great bucking bulls, was small, weighing about 1,300 pounds. His bucking style was characterized by a violent spin to the left. Earlier in his career, he tried to hook a thrown rider, but later he usually ignored them. Only a handful of cowboys made an eight-second ride on Oscar, among them Randy Majors, Jerome Robinson, Allan Jordan, Guy Barth and Don Gay. Majors and Jordan rode Oscar twice. Gay rode him three times. At the Grand National Rodeo in San Francisco, Gay and Oscar produced a 97-point ride. At that time the score was a world record for any PRCA bucking stock. The ride won the event for Gay and earned him the PRCA bull riding championship. In 1978 Jordan’s ride on Oscar earned them a 96. Oscar retired to the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, where he remained until his death in 1983.

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OLD SPEC
livestock • Bull • Inducted 1979

cowboys called him Old Spec, not with affection but with respect for the curiously spotted, cross-bred Brahma bull that in 350 attempts, over a seven-year bucking career, allowed only seven riders to make qualifying rides. It was a ratio of 50 to 1, in favor of the 1,700-pound animal. At the 1959-60 National Final Rodeo, where only the nation’s top stock appear, Spec was awarded plaques as the best bucking bull. Purchased in 1957 as a 4-year-old by stock contractors Elra and Jiggs Beutler from Tom Harlan of McLean, Texas, Spec was first ridden by former world champion Harry Tompkins that same season. Three years passed before anyone else accomplished the feat. Last to ride Spec, who had a penchant for turning on a fallen rider, was an Oklahoman Pat Scudder in 1964 in Coffeyville, Kan.

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BODACIOUS
livestock • Bull • Inducted 1999

Perhaps no bucking bull in ProRodeo history was as feared as Bodacious, a 1,900-pound cross-bred charbray that burst upon the scene in 1992. In four years, Bodacious was virtually unrideable. All muscle, the bull with the distinctive yellow coloring bucked off 127 of his 135 riders and became known for a bone-crushing style that sent many riders to the hospital, including world champions Tuff Hedeman and Terry Don West. Bodacious was known for his explosive exit out of the chute. He started out with such force it was not uncommon to see his belly from the top of the back of the chute. He was first ridden in 1993, and it took two years before another bull rider stayed on for eight seconds. His ability to buck riders off before they could nod their heads did not endear him to the cowboys. For his efforts, Bodacious was named PRCA Bull of the Year in 1994-95 and top bull of the National Finals Rodeo in 1992 and 1994-95. Owners Sammy and Carolyn Andrews retired Bodacious during the 10th round of the 1995 National Finals Rodeo. Until his untimely death in 2000, Bodacious spent his time in his home pasture, passing on his genes to future bucking stars.


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TRC - HS - February 1, 2009 09:07 PM (GMT)
How about V61??? HS

Summerrain - February 1, 2009 09:11 PM (GMT)
QUOTE
How about V61??? HS


Who is that Howard?

peycashkatz - February 1, 2009 09:17 PM (GMT)
bid ole HR of cervi's

TRC - HS - February 1, 2009 11:53 PM (GMT)
Sent some info. Hope you can read it...Do you remember the poem I wrote about him and put on the BC???? HS

Summerrain - February 2, 2009 12:07 AM (GMT)
thanks Howard

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artman182 - February 2, 2009 01:03 AM (GMT)
I think that Red Wolf should be added to that list. Great bull for a long time. He passed away recently which is very unfortunate.

Arthur

TRC - HS - February 2, 2009 02:24 AM (GMT)
Something unique on records was the number of outs of V61. But back then in 1972 a score of 94 points was unheard of. HS

T.S. - February 2, 2009 02:37 AM (GMT)
QUOTE (TRC - HS @ Feb 1 2009, 08:24 PM)
Something unique on records was the number of outs of V61. But back then in 1972 a score of 94 points was unheard of. HS

DIDNT HE HAVE LIKE 5000 TRIPS ON HIM ?

HAHA .. I DONT KNOW/REMEMBER THAT BULL BUT I HAVE READ A LITTLE BOUT HIM AND I THINK HE WAS THE REAL DEAL !!

TRC - HS - February 2, 2009 03:27 AM (GMT)
He Poco Loco, get you maginfying glass and read. And just think , he was just a dang old bramer. HS

J.D.R. - February 2, 2009 05:40 AM (GMT)
its cool to see and read a lil about those ole greats. i didnt know red wolf had passed on, that was one of my favorites.

j\v livestock - February 2, 2009 05:47 AM (GMT)
the other thing is those old bulls didn't get pampered. nowdays a bull gets10 or 12 outs without being covered and all of a sudden he is great cowboy scott

tdteel - February 2, 2009 01:09 PM (GMT)
Good thread. Love reading about bulls in the past.

Summerrain - February 2, 2009 01:55 PM (GMT)
Im happy everyone is enjoying this, I plan on adding periodically more history for everyone!

nrscindy - February 2, 2009 03:52 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (T.S. @ Feb 1 2009, 09:37 PM)
QUOTE (TRC - HS @ Feb 1 2009, 08:24 PM)
Something unique on records was the number of outs of V61.  But back then in 1972 a score of 94 points was unheard of.  HS

DIDNT HE HAVE LIKE 5000 TRIPS ON HIM ?

HAHA .. I DONT KNOW/REMEMBER THAT BULL BUT I HAVE READ A LITTLE BOUT HIM AND I THINK HE WAS THE REAL DEAL !!

TRAE, it says in the caption... 266 outs before he was ridden......just thought I would help you for a change!!!!! ....Cindy..... cheers

fyrfyter - February 2, 2009 04:57 PM (GMT)
Minick bought V61 from Sloan Williams. Back in the 60's and early 70's he had as good a pen of bulls as anyone. He had one he called Grasshopper that was probably ranker than V61. When Sloan had V61 he called him Slim Jim.

TAXI - February 2, 2009 10:12 PM (GMT)
A friend of mine pulled Johnny Q's rope that day. He said he reached down with one hand and took the slack out of it, Johnny took the rope from him and backed it off! Larry said you could put your hand between the rope and the bull's back!!!!!! bbull

Summerrain - February 2, 2009 10:50 PM (GMT)
Some more history for you:)
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CHRISTENSEN BROTHERS
Henry & Robert Sr.
Stock Contractor • Inducted 1989

Henry and Robert Christensen, with their sister, Babe, began staging backyard Sunday rodeos in the 1930s. Their bucking broncs were horses that had worked all week and their Brahmas were cows. They charged a dime for admission. Henry was born Oct. 15, 1911, in Lake Creek, Ore., and Robert was born June 18, 1913, in Eugene, Ore. In 1936 Christensen Brothers contracted for their first “paying” rodeo, driving the stock 60 miles by horseback. Christensen Brothers Rodeo and Stock Company grew to 15,000 acres and became known as a company that helped develop the sport as we know it today. Over the years, the CB string produced broncs of the year, War Paint and Checkmate; bareback horses, Smith and Velvet; and bull, Oscar’s Velvet (son of Hall of Famer Oscar). For more than 50 years, Christensen Brothers trucks and trailers kept in tact the dirt arenas of the Pacific Northwest and Western circuit. Henry died April 10, 1986


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MIKE CERVI
Stock Contractor • Inducted 2003

Mike Cervi, the largest rodeo producer in the country, was always a deal-maker and entrepreneur. As an elementary schoolboy, he sold flavored toothpicks and Christmas trees, hauled ashes and rode racehorses. Born Sept. 9, 1936, in Denver, Cervi became fascinated by rodeo clowns and, by 14, had a trained mule act at Little Britches and junior rodeos. In 1958 the Cervi family acquired the family ranch near Sterling, Colo., and Cervi became foreman. By 1964, he was buying cattle, including a herd from Oregon, which was reported to be the biggest livestock sale ever in Colorado. He was also producing rodeos. In 1957 he purchased the Beutler Brothers Rodeo Company, now known as Beutler Brothers and Cervi Rodeo Company, and in 1974 bought the Billy Minick Rodeo Company, now known as Cervi Championship Rodeo Company. For the past three decades, Cervi, two-time PRCA Stock Contractor of the Year (1983, 2001), has produced many of the country’s biggest rodeos, including RodeoHouston, the National Western Stock Show & Rodeo in Denver and the San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo. Cervi annually takes many of his animals to the Wrangler NFR.

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WARREN G. (Freckles) BROWN
Bull Riding • Inducted 1979

Known as Freckles, Warren G. Brown won the world bull riding title in 1962 at the age of 41, making him the oldest man in ProRodeo history to win a riding-event championship title. World War II interrupted Brown’s rodeo career. A member of the OSS, he made four combat parachute jumps into China, where he staged a rodeo using Army mules and native cattle. Following the war, Brown resumed his rodeo career and suffered several injuries, including broken legs and a broken neck. After winning the world title in 1962, he finished third in 1966 and 1968 and fifth in 1967. Tornado, a famous bucking bull, tossed more than 200 world-class bull riders in the dirt before Brown rode him and made it to the whistle. Brown was born Jan. 28, 1921, in Wheatland, Wyo., and passed away on March 20, 1987.
World championships: 1 (1962)



nrscindy - February 2, 2009 11:33 PM (GMT)
This is so interesting... Thanks Marcia and all......Cindy... cheers

artman182 - February 2, 2009 11:50 PM (GMT)
I have the Christenson Brothers book and I can't wait to start it soon. How about the Buetler brothers? I know they have a breeding program that goes back to the 60's (Howard, please correct me if I'm wrong, I know you were around then). laughing

Arthur

Summerrain - February 3, 2009 12:29 AM (GMT)
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LYNN BEUTLER
Stock Contractor • Inducted 1979

Lynn Beutler of Elk City, Okla., was an integral part of professional rodeo for 40 years, becoming one of the sport’s most widely known stock contractors in the family rodeo company known as Beutler Brothers. The company, started in 1929 with Lynn, Jake and Elra Beutler, was recognized as one of the top stock contracting firms producing rodeos across the Southwest and Northwest. The most noted animal in the Beutler string was six-time Bucking Horse of the Year Descent, a palomino gelding. Lynn purchased the horse from Art Douglas. In 1954, Elra Beutler branched out on his own and 12 years later, Lynn and Jake sold the firm’s name, trucks, trailer, tack and all bucking stock to Mike Cervi of Sterling, Colo., who changed the name to Beutler Brothers & Cervi Rodeo Co. Lynn stayed on as a consultant with Mike Cervi until 1969. Lynn was also instrumental in the rodeo business, planning and producing the first National Finals Rodeo in Dallas in 1959. For the next 17 years, he served as an elected representative for all PRCA stock contractors on the NFR Committee. An astute businessman, always colorfully attired, his rodeos were smooth, fast-paced productions with top stock. Lynn died April 29, 1999.


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BENNY BINION
Rodeo Notable • Inducted 1988

Benny Binion was born on a Texas farm in 1901 and began trading horses for a living when he was just 10 years old. Through the years, he raised some of the best bucking and pickup horses in rodeo. ProRodeo Hall of Fame stock contractors such as Harry Knight, Lynn Beutler, Harry Vold and Mike Cervi have owned Binion horses. Binion worked for 30 years to bring an invitational rodeo to Las Vegas. In 1985, wanting to help both his cowboy comrades and the town, Binion accomplished his goal with the move of the National Finals Rodeo from Oklahoma City to Las Vegas. In the ensuing 20 years, the NFR has become one of the top tickets in sports and one of Las Vegas’ most prestigious and lucrative two weeks of the year. In 1985, the PRCA named Binion ProRodeo Man of the Year. Binion played a significant role in the evolution of ProRodeo – from his sponsorship of a Winston Tour outfit, his influence in the NFR move and his sponsorship of NFR contestant entry fees. Despite his death in 1989, Binion’s legacy lives on during each round of the NFR when the flashy red stagecoach bearing his name and drawn by six Quarter horses makes its way around the arena. He never climbed over a chute gate, but Binion carried the spirit of the cowboy in his heart.


Summerrain - February 3, 2009 12:40 AM (GMT)
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#CP47 Grandpa Charlie

This bull has produced the longest DNA proven bloodline available today!

He is the sire of "White Sports Coat"

Grandsire of "Houdini", "Panhandle Slim" & "Rooster"

Great Grandsire of "Night Life", "Wild Life" and many others!

The list of great bulls and cows out of #CP47 is endless.


A brief history of this particular lineage of cows and bulls, most commonly referred to as "Plummers" because of the extensive use and breeding of these animals by Charlie Plummer of Sayer, Oklahoma (1920-1986).

This lineage actually began around 1940 with a gentleman cowboy by the name of Tom Harlan from Kellerville, Texas (1907-1994). Tom began to organize ropings and ridings around the area of Pampa and McClain, Texas, with some of the stock he had raised in the early 1940s. He built up his breeding program as he continued to hold rodeos through the early 1960s. Around 1963, Charlie Plummer bought his first set of bulls and cows from Harlan. He too, began putting on rodeos with the bulls out of this lineage, bulls that would become legends for their bad temperament and bucking ability. Like Harlan, Plummer took great pride in keeping a "line breed" of these cows and bulls. From the early 1960’s through the early 1980’s, we managed to make a few of Charlie Plummer’s rodeos. We watched many great Plummer bulls over the years and became quite familiar with their breeding. Some of the earliest of Plummer’s bulls weren’t what most would consider “Plummer” nowadays. Most were solid colored bulls with more Brahma characteristics. There were only a few spotted bulls in the beginning. Charlie selected for the color and bucking characteristics in his breeding program, and through the years both color and buck got more consistent.

The rodeo world lost two great men, both of them cowboys and visionaries, when Plummer died in 1986 and Harlan retired to a home in Pampa. Harlan later passed away in 1994. Plummer's stock was sold in an estate sale, and as a result there have been several breeding programs continue this lineage. One of the oldest such programs, C&C Rodeo Company of Childress, Texas, is owned by Freddy and Wardie Cordell. Freddy, having bought many of his cows and bulls from Tom Harlan, has produced some of the most famous bulls in the PRCA and the PBR including "Mo-Betta" and "Jack Daniels Happy Hour". Ronnie Roach of Cache, Oklahoma, owner of Rafter 7r bulls, has spent the better part of the last 2 decades building and perfecting one of the most elite sets of these lineage-bred cows in the country, with bull after bull going on to the PRCA and PBR ranks, and many qualifying for the NFR and the PBR Finals. JC Rodeo Co., Roxbury, KS is owned by Jimmy Crowthers. Jim bought his first three bulls from Plummer in 1978 and later that year bought his first six heifers. After more than twenty years of breeding, Crowthers now has one of the best line-bred cow herds producing many bulls that have gone on to the PRCA and PBR ranks.

Dillon and H. D. Page of Ardmore, Oklahoma, are another long time breeder of the lineage, with a phenomenal percentage of bulls moving on to the professional ranks. A large number of these bulls are seen each week on the PBR Telecast and PBR Finals.

Monty Samford of Clyde, Texas, has spent years putting together an extensive program of Plummer cows and bulls. He has devoted countless hours to maintaining a record and a history on his cows and bulls, weeding out any undesirable characteristics. Many of his herd genetic bulls are featured at the PRCA and PBR Finals.

One of the members of this elite group was Rocking K Rodeo Company originally of Lawton, Oklahoma. Rocking K was started and owned by Larry and Rosemary Kephart. Larry died of cancer in 1999, but all his hard work in keeping together an outstanding line of Plummer cows and bulls has been carried on by Rosemary, with the same intense dedication and care.

Dodge City Bull Company owned by Lynn Rice, purchased their first Plummer cows from Rocking K Rodeo Company in 1997 and has had one of the most progressive programs in the industry ever since. Lynn moved his breeding program to Antlers, Oklahoma and started Rice Ranch. Lynn was the major purchaser of the Rocking K brand since 1997 and continued to do business with Rosemary after Larry's death in 1999. Lynn and Rosemary realized they shared a great interest in cattle and the Rice Ranch became the new home of the Rocking K brand.

Breeders with their rigid breeding programs have revolutionized the bucking bull industry. Rafter N Ranch is proud to follow and be a part of this revolution and able to carry on the dreams and traditions of men like Tom Harlan, Charlie Plummer and Larry Kephart

Summerrain - February 3, 2009 12:42 AM (GMT)
Taken from Rice Ranch Site

A History of Plummer

A brief history of this particular lineage of cows and bulls, most commonly referred to as "Plummers" because of the extensive use and breeding of these animals by Charlie Plummer of Sayer, Oklahoma (1920-1986).

This lineage actually began around 1940 with a gentleman cowboy by the name of Tom Harlan from Kellerville, Texas (1907-1994). Tom began to organize roping and riding events around the area of Pampa and McClain, Texas, with some of the stock he had raised in the early 1940’s. He built up his breeding program as he continued to hold rodeos through the early 1960’s.

Around 1963, Charlie Plummer bought his first set of bulls and cows from Harlan. He too, began putting on rodeos with the bulls out of this lineage, bulls that would become legends for their bad temperament and bucking ability. Like Harlan, Plummer took great pride in keeping a "line breed" of these cows and bulls.

The rodeo world lost two great men, both of them cowboys and visionaries, when Plummer died in 1986 and Harlan retired to a home in Pampa. Harlan later passed away in 1994. Plummer's stock was sold in an estate sale, and as a result there have been several breeding programs continue this lineage.

Ronnie Roach of Cache, Oklahoma, owner of Rafter 7 bulls, has spent the better part of the last 2 decades building and perfecting one of the most elite sets of these lineage-bred cows in the country, with bull after bull going on to the PRCA and PBR ranks, and many qualifying for the NFR and the PBR Finals.

JC Rodeo Co., Roxbury, KS is owned by Jimmy Crowthers. Jim bought his first three bulls from Plummer in 1978 and later that year bought his first six heifers. After more than twenty years of breeding, Crowthers now has one of the best line-bred cow herds producing many bulls that have gone on to the PRCA and PBR ranks.

Dillon and H. D. Page of Ardmore, Oklahoma, are another long time breeder of the lineage, with a phenomenal percentage of bulls moving on to the professional ranks. A large number of these bulls are seen each week on the PBR Telecast and PBR Finals.

Darrell Hargis of Henrietta, Texas, has spent years putting together an extensive program of Plummer cows and bulls. He has devoted countless hours to maintaining a record and a history on his cows and bulls, weeding out any undesirable characteristics. Many of his bulls are featured at the PRCA and PBR Finals.

One of the most outstanding members of this elite group was Rocking K Rodeo Company originally of Lawton, Oklahoma. Rocking K was started and owned by Larry and Rosemary Kephart. Larry died of cancer in 1999, but all his hard work in keeping together an outstanding line of Plummer cows and bulls has been carried on by Rosemary, with the same intense dedication and care.

Dodge City Bull Company owned by Lynn Rice, purchased their first Plummer cows from Rocking K Rodeo Company in 1997 and has had one of the most progressive programs in the industry ever since. Lynn moved his breeding program to Antlers, Oklahoma and started Rice Ranch. Lynn was the major purchaser of the Rocking K brand since 1997 and continued to do business with Rosemary after Larry's death in 1999. Lynn and Rosemary realized they not only shared a great interest in cattle, but were true "soul mates" and Rice Ranch became the new home of the Rocking K brand.

Today Lynn and Rosemary have what is probably the most technologically advanced breeding program in the rodeo industry. Using the process of embryo transfers, instead of raising just one outstanding calf per year, their program allows them to raise as many as twenty full brothers and sisters out of each of there phenomenal Plummer cows per year.

These breeders with their rigid breeding programs have revolutionized the bucking bull industry. Rice Ranch is proud to be a part of this revolution and able to carry on the dreams and traditions of men like Tom Harlan, Charlie Plummer and Larry Kephart.



Summerrain - February 3, 2009 12:48 AM (GMT)
Taken from Rafter 7 website

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The Rafter 7r was founded by the late Ronnie Roach over 20 years ago. The bloodlines and improvements are carried on by his wife Nancy, sons Royce and Brady, along with daughter Lindsey.

Ronnie Roach grew up riding bulls in Southwest Oklahoma. From the early 1960’s through the early 1980’s, he managed to make a few of Charlie Plummer’s rodeos. He watched many great Plummer bulls over the years and became quite familiar with their breeding. Some of the earliest of Plummer’s bulls weren’t what most would consider “Plummer” nowadays. Most were solid colored bulls with more brahma characteristics. There were only a few spotted bulls in the beginning. Charlie selected for the color and bucking characteristics in his breeding program, and through the years both color and buck became more consistent.



After retiring his spurs and rope, Ronnie bought bulls out of the sale barns and wherever else he could find them. He had a pretty good eye for finding bucking bulls, but the really good ones didn’t come along very often. In 1986, the year after Charlie Plummer’s passing, he was given the opportunity to purchase some females from the Plummer Ranch. He had watched too many good bulls from Charlie’s program over the years to let the opportunity pass him by. He purchased 18 head of bred heifers from the Plummer family to start what is now the Rafter 7r.



Nancy Roach along with sons, Royce and Brady, and daughter Lindsey make up the Rafter 7r in Cache, OK. Nearly twenty years and a lot of mended fences later, the Rafter 7r maintains about 70 females carrying deep “Plummer” genetics. The Charlie Plummer bloodline serves as a foundation for the Rafter 7r program, and there has been an ongoing effort to maintain some purebred "Plummer" genetics within the herd.




Summerrain - February 3, 2009 12:58 AM (GMT)
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EVERETT BOWMAN
All-Around • Inducted 1979

Winner of 10 world championships in nine years, Everett Bowman’s dynamic leadership made him one of the great rodeo contributors to the advancement of professional rodeo. Bowman, born July 12, 1899, in Hope, N.M., won his titles during a career that spanned more than 20 years. Bowman won all-around championships in 1935 and 1937; tie-down roping championships in 1929, 1935 and 1937; world steer wrestling championships in 1930, 1933, 1935 and 1938; and the world steer roping champion in 1937. When the cowboys’ Turtle Association was founded in 1936, he was elected president, an office he held until reorganization of the CTA to the Rodeo cowboys Association in 1945. Most of the fundamental changes in rodeo that are now the bedrock of the sport came about under Bowman’s leadership: adding entry fees to prize money, fair and impartial judging, codified rules and regulations, humane treatment of livestock and minimum standards for approval as a professional rodeo. Bowman died in 1971 in a plane crash in Arizona.
World championships: 10 (2, all-around, 1935, 1937; 3, tie-down roping, 1929, 1935, 1937; 4, steer wrestling, 1930, 1933, 1935, 1938; 1, steer roping, 1937)


nrscindy - February 3, 2009 05:15 AM (GMT)

I ran across this looking for a picture of Wolfman. I thought it was neat..Cindy... cheers..



[URL= http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TtNnoVQJ3MI]wolfman[/URL]

nrscindy - February 4, 2009 01:22 AM (GMT)
:)

Summerrain - December 30, 2011 02:27 PM (GMT)
wow forgot about this thread :)

jake - December 30, 2011 06:46 PM (GMT)
GREAT STUFF, for those that dont know already Binion also started the World Series Of Poker, it got so BIG it had move from Binions Horseshoe to the bigger RIO Casino, few in history LOVED rodeo & cowboys more than Benny & few contributed as much in my book with his legacy at NFR bucking sale <cb> fishook13@hotmail.com

JCrawford - December 30, 2011 07:36 PM (GMT)
I work with Ronnie brother and you want to talk about a spitting image of ronnie.

bittersweet - December 30, 2011 11:08 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (Summerrain @ Dec 30 2011, 08:27 AM)
wow forgot about this thread :)

This is some very good reading..thanks for bringing it back to the top Marcia..

Summerrain - December 31, 2011 01:35 AM (GMT)
Your welcome Karen, love reading about how the industry has evolved




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